Insurance Blog

What You Need to Know About Dorm & Renters Insurance For College Students

If your college-bound student will be living in a dorm or other campus housing, her belongings may be covered under your homeowners or renters insurance policy. However, the Insurance Information Institute (III) says that some policies limit coverage for belongings while your student is away from the your home. Dorm insurance protects your student's personal property against damage or loss, and renters insures both of you in case someone is injured while on non-campus residences.


Do Students Need Renters Insurance?

A college student who is under 26 years old, enrolled in classes, and living in on-campus housing, may be covered under your homeowners/renters insurance policy. But, even if a student is a dependent under his or her parent's insurance, the student's personal property, in many cases, is not covered if the student lives off-campus. Furthermore, coverage for on-campus losses depends on the insurance carrier and your insurance deductible. (See: Choosing The Right Coverage.)

College students living in off-campus housing are ideal candidates for renters insurance, since many students bring thousands of dollars worth of personal items, such as electronics, a computer, televisions, gaming devices, bicycles, and furniture with them to their home away from home. As a renter, It is their—  or perhaps your — responsibility to provide coverage for these valuable items. The landlord’s insurance does not cover their personal property in the event that it is stolen or damaged as a result of a fire, theft or other unexpected circumstance. 

Thursday, 10 August 2017 20:10

National Motorcycle Safety Week

Motorcycle Week runs from August 14 through the 20th this year. There are events throughout the country, which means many people take to the roads for the annual bike week quest. As with every Motorcycle Week, there are accidents and fatalities. There is a growing trend in the number of motorcycle fatalities and accidents each year, making motorcycle safety a real concern for riders. Read on for some basic tips to help you arrive at your destination…safely.

 

Thursday, 10 August 2017 14:14

Beware Fake Eclipse Glasses

The moon will pass between the Earth and Sun on August 21st, entirely blocking the sun and briefly turning day into night in some parts of the United States. New Englanders will see a partial eclipse, weather permitting. This must see event is the first of its kind in the United States in over 38 year -- the last one in America was February 26, 1979. It is estimated that nearly 100 million people in the United States will view a portion of the 2017 solar eclipse, making it the most-viewed eclipse ever. If you plan to view the eclipse, you will need protection for your eyes.

According to Prevent Blindness, "Exposing your eyes to the sun without proper eye protection during a solar eclipse can cause 'eclipse blindness' or retinal burns, also known as solar retinopathy. This exposure to the light can cause damage or even destroy cells in the retina (the back of the eye) that transmit what you see to the brain. This damage can be temporary or permanent and occurs with no pain. It can take a few hours to a few days after viewing the solar eclipse to realize the damage that has occurred." The Prevent Blindess website offers a  download with guidelines for viewing the solar eclipsesolar eclipse. Also check out the safety guidelines for ISO and CE certified eclipse glassesISO and CE certified eclipse glasses at Eclipse Glasses Online.

How to Safely View the Solar Exclipse

The only safe way to view the partial or total solar eclipse is with eclipse glasses and solar filters. Homemade devices are not safe. Follow these steps for a safe viewing experience:

  • Stand still and cover your eyes with your eclipse glasses or solar viewer before looking up at the bright sun.
  • After glancing at the sun, turn away and remove your filter — do not remove it while looking at the sun.
  • Do not look at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun through an unfiltered camera, telescope, binoculars or other optical device.
  • Similarly, do not look at the sun through a camera, a telescope, binoculars or any other optical device while using your eclipse glasses or hand-held solar viewer — the concentrated solar rays will damage the filter and enter your eye(s), causing serious injury.
  • Seek expert advice from an astronomer before using a solar filter with a camera, a telescope, binoculars or any other optical device.
  • If you are within the path of totality, remove your solar filter only when the moon completely covers the sun’s bright face and it suddenly gets quite dark. As soon as the bright sun begins to reappear, replace your solar viewer to glance at the remaining partial phases.
  • There are many websites and stores where you can purchase  handheld viewing devices or glasses, however, not all products will truly protect your eyes. Therefore, to ensure you have the best protection available, make sure you choose viewers that have been verified by an accredited testing laboratory to meet the ISO 12312-2 international safety standard. The American Astronomical Society (AAS) has approved of the following well-known telescope and solar-filter companies. Those with an asterisk (*) are based outside the United States. 

Solar Viewer Brands

Using the proper equipment will ensure a safe, memorable experience. Protect your eyes and enjoy this historic event!

 

*This information about eclipse sunglasses or other products is not an endorsement from Baldwin | Welsh & Parker. The article is for informational/educational purposes only.

 

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