Insurance Blog
Thursday, 10 August 2017 20:10

National Motorcycle Safety Week

Motorcycle Week runs from August 14 through the 20th this year. There are events throughout the country, which means many people take to the roads for the annual bike week quest. As with every Motorcycle Week, there are accidents and fatalities. There is a growing trend in the number of motorcycle fatalities and accidents each year, making motorcycle safety a real concern for riders. Read on for some basic tips to help you arrive at your destination…safely.

 

Thursday, 10 August 2017 14:14

Beware Fake Eclipse Glasses

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The moon will pass between the Earth and Sun on August 21st, entirely blocking the sun and briefly turning day into night in some parts of the United States. New Englanders will see a partial eclipse, weather permitting. This must see event is the first of its kind in the United States in over 38 year -- the last one in America was February 26, 1979. It is estimated that nearly 100 million people in the United States will view a portion of the 2017 solar eclipse, making it the most-viewed eclipse ever. If you plan to view the eclipse, you will need protection for your eyes.

According to Prevent Blindness, "Exposing your eyes to the sun without proper eye protection during a solar eclipse can cause 'eclipse blindness' or retinal burns, also known as solar retinopathy. This exposure to the light can cause damage or even destroy cells in the retina (the back of the eye) that transmit what you see to the brain. This damage can be temporary or permanent and occurs with no pain. It can take a few hours to a few days after viewing the solar eclipse to realize the damage that has occurred." The Prevent Blindess website offers a  download with guidelines for viewing the solar eclipsesolar eclipse. Also check out the safety guidelines for ISO and CE certified eclipse glassesISO and CE certified eclipse glasses at Eclipse Glasses Online.

How to Safely View the Solar Exclipse

The only safe way to view the partial or total solar eclipse is with eclipse glasses and solar filters. Homemade devices are not safe. Follow these steps for a safe viewing experience:

  • Stand still and cover your eyes with your eclipse glasses or solar viewer before looking up at the bright sun.
  • After glancing at the sun, turn away and remove your filter — do not remove it while looking at the sun.
  • Do not look at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun through an unfiltered camera, telescope, binoculars or other optical device.
  • Similarly, do not look at the sun through a camera, a telescope, binoculars or any other optical device while using your eclipse glasses or hand-held solar viewer — the concentrated solar rays will damage the filter and enter your eye(s), causing serious injury.
  • Seek expert advice from an astronomer before using a solar filter with a camera, a telescope, binoculars or any other optical device.
  • If you are within the path of totality, remove your solar filter only when the moon completely covers the sun’s bright face and it suddenly gets quite dark. As soon as the bright sun begins to reappear, replace your solar viewer to glance at the remaining partial phases.
  • There are many websites and stores where you can purchase  handheld viewing devices or glasses, however, not all products will truly protect your eyes. Therefore, to ensure you have the best protection available, make sure you choose viewers that have been verified by an accredited testing laboratory to meet the ISO 12312-2 international safety standard. The American Astronomical Society (AAS) has approved of the following well-known telescope and solar-filter companies. Those with an asterisk (*) are based outside the United States. 

Solar Viewer Brands

Using the proper equipment will ensure a safe, memorable experience. Protect your eyes and enjoy this historic event!

 

*This information about eclipse sunglasses or other products is not an endorsement from Baldwin | Welsh & Parker. The article is for informational/educational purposes only.

 

Friday, 04 August 2017 03:02

Auto Claims After a Car Accident

Auto insurance is meant to protect you by covering your bills after an accident. However, the amount of compensation can vary greatly depending on the type of claim that’s made by insurance carriers and the value of your vehicle. The decision to have your vehicle repaired or declared a total loss directly impacts how much you receive.


Determining a Claim

If you’re in an accident, the at-fault driver’s insurance carrier will analyze the approximate value of your vehicle before the accident as well as the cost to repair it afterward. Typically, the pre-accident value of your vehicle is determined by finding its actual cash value. This value is found by taking the price of a similar replacement vehicle in your area and then subtracting any pre-accident depreciation, such as your vehicle’s mileage and history.

If the cost to repair your vehicle is less than its actual cash value, insurers will usually opt to compensate you for the repairs. However, if the cost is too high or if the vehicle can’t be restored to a safe condition, insurers may declare it a total loss.


Total Loss Claims

If your vehicle is declared a total loss, you’ll be compensated with the full actual cash value of your vehicle, minus any applicable policy deductible. 

However, if a financed or loaned vehicle is declared a total loss, the insurer will pay the remaining balance to the finance company first. Here’s a breakdown of the two most common scenarios that occur when a financed vehicle is declared a total loss:

  • The actual cash value of the vehicle is greater than the remaining balance of the loan. In this scenario, the insurer pays off the loan and then gives you the amount by which the actual cash value exceeds the loan balance.
  • The actual cash value of the vehicle is less than the remaining balance on the loan. In this scenario, you are responsible for the difference between the actual cash value and the remaining loan balance.

Repairs and Diminished Value Claims

Getting a check for the full cost of your vehicle’s repairs may seem like a best-case scenario. However, repairs can substantially reduce your vehicle’s value. Even if it drives better than ever after being repaired, the fact that it was in an accident will taint its history and lead to a lower price if you ever choose to sell it. However, you can file a diminished value claim against an insurance carrier to try to recover any value that’s lost as a result of repairs.

Most states and insurance contracts prevent policyholders from bringing diminished value claims against their own insurers. However, if another driver is at fault for an accident and his or her insurance pays for your repairs, you may be able to use a diminished value claim to recover any lost value.

Because few vehicles are appraised immediately before they’re involved in an accident, it can be hard to prove that value has been lost after they’re repaired. Here are some tips you can use before and after an accident to prepare yourself for a successful diminished value claim:

  • Check third-party websites to get an approximate value for your vehicle’s make and model.
  • Take your vehicle to a pre-owned dealership after an accident for an appraisal. You can then ask for a letter that shows that your vehicle’s lower-than-average value is due to its repairs or accident history.
  • Keep documentation about any repairs or enhancements to your vehicle. These documents can help show a more detailed history of your vehicle when determining its value.
  • Contact us at (508) 358-5383 for more information about diminished value claims and to discuss the specifics of your situation.

WHAT TO DO IF YOU HAVE A CAR ACCIDENT

If you are in a car accident, you can contact our agency directly to report claims during regular business hours. You can also file a claim anytime. Visit our auto insurance claim reporting page to find your insurance company contact information, and report the acccident directly to your company.


DOWNLOAD A MASSACHUSETTS CRASH REPORT

Download the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Motor Vehicle Crash Operator Report form and follow the instructions for submitting the form by mail to the Massachusetts Registry of Motor Vehicles.

When Should You File a Report

  • You should file a report if you’re the operator of a vehicle involved in a crash where the damage to any one vehicle or property is over $1000, or if there is an injury to any person, even if a police officer was on the scene. You should file the report within 5 days of the date of the crash.

When Should You NOT File a Report

  • You should not file a report if the crash occurred on a private road, driveway, private parking lot or other private way.

Why this Report is Important

  • Data from this report is used for many purposes including:
  • Identifying locations with a large number of crashes.
  • Improving dangerous highways and intersections.
  • Developing highway safety public information programs.
  • Developing programs to save lives and reduce highway injuries.

Be Prepared

There are few things more dangerous and stressful than getting into an accident. Contact us at (508) 358-5383, and we will provide you with a variety of resources.

Contact Us Today

Bedford, MA - 781-275-2114

Hudson, MA - 978-562-5652

Wayland, MA - 508-358-5383

Winthrop, MA - 617-846-0731

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