Insurance Blog
Wednesday, 01 August 2018 06:02

Camp Fire Safety Tips

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How to Build, Maintain & Extinguish Your Campfire

A camp fire can be one of the best parts of camping, or provide necessary warmth to hunters and other outdoor enthusiasts. Just don’t forget your responsibility to maintain and extinguish it to prevent wild fires. With the wild fires in California happening right now, it's time to talk about fire safety to prevent damaging and life-threatening fires wherever you travel.

Keep your camp fire from becoming a wild fire!

BEFORE ...

  • Choose a spot that’s protected from wind gusts and at least 15 feet from your tent, gear, and anything ammable.
  • Clear a 10-foot diameter area around your camp re spot by removing leaves, grass, and anything burnable down to the dirt.
  • Don’t build your camp re near plants or under tree limbs or other ammable material hanging overhead.
  • If allowed, dig a pit for your camp fire, about 1-foot deep, in the center of the cleared area.
  • Build a fire ring around the pit with rocks to create a barrier.
  • Don’t use any type of ammable liquid to start your fire.
  • Gather three types of wood to build your camp re and add them in this order:
    • Tinder - small twigs, dry Kindling – dry sticks leaves or grass, dry needles
    • Kindling - dry sticks leaves or grass, dry needles. smaller than 1” around
    • Firewood - larger, dry pieces of wood up to about 10” around.
Wednesday, 01 August 2018 04:26

4 Useful Summer Health Hacks You Need to Know

Heatstroke, sunburn, creepy crawlies, and dehydration, oh my! While summer means lots of fun (think, sunshine, sweat and cookouts) it also brings health hazards. Plymouth Rock reviewed four common dangers and got summer health tips from the experts to help keep you and your family safe.

Heatstroke

What it is: Heatstroke is caused by the body overheating, usually from excessive exposure to, or strenuous activity in, high temperatures. Other contributing factors include wearing excess clothing, alcohol consumption and dehydration.

How to treat it: You, or someone you know, might have heatstroke if they are overheated and show unusual signs, including:

  • Slurred speech
  • Nausea
  • Flushed skin
  • Rapid breathing or racing heart rate
  • Throbbing headache

If you start to see some of those signs, seek emergency help immediately. While you wait for emergency personnel, cool down as quickly as you can by moving indoors or into the shade, and removing excessive clothing.

How to avoid it: Avoid activity during the hottest parts of the day. Wear loose clothing, sunscreen, a wide-brimmed hat and drink plenty of water. If you take medications, check to see if they affect your body’s level of hydration. Also, never leave anyone, including pets, in a parked vehicle.

Sunburn

What it is: Literally skin that’s been burned by too much exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light. Skin may be pink or red, feel warm to the touch, swell, be tender, itch or develop blisters. Severe sunburn may be accompanied by a headache, fever, chills and fatigue.

How to treat it: Over-the-counter pain relievers may help reduce pain and swelling from sunburn. Applying moisturizer or aloe vera may also help reduce pain and swelling, and encourage healing. Drink plenty of water to help the skin recover.

How to avoid it: Base tans won’t protect you. Instead, try a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or more, and apply it often and generously. You can also sport sunglasses, wide-brimmed hats and special clothing with SPF protection. Read more about protective clothing and its unique SPF rating system.

Creepy Crawlies (Who Knew This Was A Thing?)

What it is: An allergic reaction to a bite or sting from any one of the many bugs that come out to play during the summer. It could be mosquitoes, spiders, bees or ants. You don’t need to have a history of severe allergic reactions to experience one. If you have difficulty breathing, swelling of the lips, eyelids or throat, or have dizziness, hives or similar symptoms, seek emergency help immediately.

How to treat it: If you’re bitten or stung, move away from the area to avoid more bites or stings. Once you’re safe, remove any stingers, if needed, and wash the area with soap and water. Follow with a cold compress to reduce pain and swelling. Over-the-counter medications can also help.

How to avoid it: Bug sprays will help keep some bugs, like mosquitoes, at bay. When it comes to other bugs such as spiders or wasps, be aware of your surroundings. One summer, I accidently upset a yellow jacket nest. The scariest part is that they will chase you when you run. The bad news is swatting at them only makes them angrier. If that happens, try to stay calm (easier said than done, I know), cover your face and run as fast as you can. In my case, I had to grab a garden hose to get them off me.

Dehydration

What it is: When your body uses or loses more fluid than it takes in, it can’t carry out normal functions.

How to treat it: Mild dehydration can usually be reversed by drinking more water. If you’re experiencing extreme thirst, little or no urination, shriveled skin, dizziness and confusion, seek help right away.

How to avoid it: Drink plenty of water or sports drinks and eat foods that have high water content, like fruits and veggies. On really humid days, you’ll want to drink extra water to make up for the extra sweat factor. According to the Institute of Medicine, men should drink 13 eight-ounce glasses of water in a day and ladies should drink nine eight-ounce glasses of water in a day.

Baldwin | Welsh & Parker and Plymouth Rock hope everyone has a safe, healthy and fun summer. 

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Source: Our thanks to PlymouthRock (original articel contains a few small edits)

 

Tuesday, 24 July 2018 16:37

Prevent Accidental Pool Drownings

Drowning is the Leading Cause of Unintentional Death in Children Under the Age of 5

This past June, life changed tragically for former Olympic alpine skier Bode Miller and his wife, Morgan Beck Miller. Their 19 month-old daughter, Emmy, drowned as a result of an accident in a neighbor’s pool.

The parents talked openly about the accident during an interview on the “Today” show this week. “I can attest from first-hand experience that it’s unbelievable quick and it’s unbelievable sneaky,” Bode said. He added, “You’d think it’d be, like some weird circumstance or some strange thing. And it’s not. It just happens in the blink of an eye.” The still grieving Millers discussed their commitment to increasing awareness about drowning, which is one of the most common deaths among young children. Bode and Morgan believe it’s their obligation to help prevent this from happening to others parents. “It’s one of those things where, as a parent now,” Morgan said, “when you go to someone else’s house, survey the home to see if it’s a safe place for your child to be.”

 

Drowing Facts

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission recently released its annual report finding that there was no significant increase in the number of reported fatal drownings in swimming pools involving children younger than five since the 2017 report. While this is good news, children under the age of five are still the most vulnerable to accidental drownings. Furthermore, the reported numbers do not include deaths related to pool accidents.

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